NEWSLETTERS - Everest South 2011

Newsletter 34 April 2011

Khumjung Main Square turns into Cricket Pitch

The team has spent its first full rest day in Khumjung and according to our guide Adrian some people took the opportunity to rest, but others leaped into action. “There was a good game of cricket going on in the main square with our team mixed with the local kids,”

Adrian reported by email. This sudden cricket activity can only be due to the fact that former Kiwi cricket player, Adam Parore, is a member of this year’s Everest expedition.

It was a perfect day with clear skies and some of the members enjoyed the magnificent views of Mount Everest and Ama Dablam from the terrace of the Everest View Hotel. Others imbibed the stunning scenery from a 4,300m-high ridge just behind the village. “It is all good and fun”, Adrian further said.

On Monday, the team will carry on to Phortse, a small settlement at 3,800m, which is the hometown of some of our Sherpas. Here they will have the chance to meet some more families of our climbing Sherpas and those, who are culturally interested, can visit a new monastery that was funded by the Sherpas of the region.

On their walk to Phortse the group will get closer views of Ama Dablam, which at 6,812m is often referred to as the ‘Matterhorn’ of Asia and is certainly one of the most spectacular mountains in the region.

As we slowly get further up the hill I will take the opportunity to introduce you to more of the Himalayan Experience members.

Adam Parore

Adam is a former wicket-keeper for the New Zealand cricket team. He played 78 test cricket matches for New Zealand and 179 one-day international cricket matches during his career, which lasted more than one decade. The 40-year-old now lives in Auckland, has a daughter and a son and is the managing director of a financial services firm.

How did you first come across Everest and who inspired you to climb it?

My interest was first triggered by the 1996 tragedy on Mount Everest. It was big news in New Zealand because of Rob Hall. Up until then I had not even known that Everest could be climbed commercially. That was also the year when I spent some time in India and on my way to Guwahati, I could see Everest from the plane and that’s when I knew I wanted to climb it. It was not until 12 months ago though that I met a mountain guide who told me more about Everest. That’s definitely when the seed was planted. Last year, I climbed Manaslu and at the beginning of this year I successfully got to the top of Mount Cook in New Zealand.

What has been your biggest achievement so far?

Fatherhood.

What is your biggest challenge on this Everest expedition?

I know that I will find it physically hard once we get high on the mountain. I think the whole expedition will be mentally challenging but I know that the last three days will be physically difficult.

How do you think Everest will change your life?

From the climbs and expeditions I have been on so far, I have always come back as a better person. I find it cathartic to be put into an isolated situation with a good group of people. I am sure I will learn more about myself and it will certainly be a good time away to stop and think.

How mentally prepared are you for the possibility of not getting to the top?

I have played cricket for many years and I had to cope with situations that were out of my control. It could be rain or that the cricket pitch was in bad condition. Mountaineering is very similar. If the weather is good and I am in good shape, I think I will have a good chance to make it. Ultimately it is not up to me whether I get to the summit or not. I will put myself in the best possible situation and after that it will be out of my control. And yes, I am prepared for not making it.

What will you carry to the summit?

I will carry an Amethyst from a friend of mine and a five dollar note featuring Edmund Hillary.

Martin Frey

Martin lives in Salt Lake City, is married and has two daughters. The 51-year-old used to be into water sports when he was living in California, however, his move to mountainous Utah kindled his love for trekking and climbing.

How did you first come across Everest and who inspired you to climb it?

Seven years ago, I came to Nepal and went on a scenic flight around Mount Everest. I was very impressed when I saw it and I was convinced that nobody could possibly climb that mountain. When I lived in California, I was an ‘ocean guy’ but when we moved to Utah I started mountaineering and climbing. Amongst other mountains, I have climbed Kilimanjaro, Mt Rainier, Denali and Aconcagua and Everest seems the next logical step. It would be fun to do the Seven Summits, however, it is not an all-consuming goal. And to combine my love for the mountains and the sea, I might even climb the Seven Summits and sail the Seven Seas!

What has been your biggest achievement so far?

Raising my 25-year old daughter as a single parent.

What is your biggest challenge on this Everest expedition?

Staying healthy and keeping my weight up.

How do you think Everest will change your life?

I don’t think Everest will change my life. The only thing I can think of is that I might expand my sense of ‘self’ and what I am capable of.

How mentally prepared are you for the possibility of not getting to the top?

I am mentally prepared for four possible scenarios why I may not make it to the summit. It may be the weather, it may be sickness, it may be that I am just not strong enough or I may get to 200 feet below the summit but have to turn around because I am running out of time. I think I would come to terms with all of them. Climbing Everest is not a life-and-death thing for me and if I am not good enough this time, I might even come back.

What will you carry to the summit?

I am taking a picture of my friend Steve Gasser. The photo was taken on the summit of Denali in 2009. Steve and I were going to do the Seven Summits together but he sadly died of a heart attack in October 2010